Wednesday, 1 April 2015

The Cardrona Bra Fence, New Zealand

The Cardrona Bra Fence was a controversial tourist attraction in Central Otago, New Zealand. The story began sometime between Christmas 1999 and New Year's Day 2000, when four bras were hanging on the fence. The fence gradually became a famous site as the number of bras grew to hundreds. It is still unknown the origin of this fact. News spread of the addition, which was left on the fence by the local landowners, and more bras began to appear. After two months there were some 60 bras, but at about this time they were all removed anonymously. This was reported in the local press, and the story gained widespread dissemination through the New Zealand media, leading to more bras appearing, and in October 2000 around 200 bras were removed and the fence was cleared of bras and this time the story spread even wider, as the fence had by this time become to some a quirky tourist attraction, and media sources from as far afield as Europe became interested in the fence. Due to this interest the number of bras being added to the fence personally or sent to be added increased dramatically.

The Cardrona Bra Fence, New Zealand

Tuesday, 31 March 2015

The Long Room Library, Dublin

Trinity College Library Dublin, Located in the center of Dublin, Ireland’s capital city the largest library in Ireland. The original and Old Library is Thomas Burgh’s masterpiece. A huge building, it originally towered over the university. The Book of Kells is located in the Old Library, along with the Book of Durrow, the Book of Howth and other ancient texts. Also incorporating the Long Room, It covers the whole 400 years of the Library's development, the Old Library is one of Ireland's biggest tourist attractions, and holds thousands of rare, and in many cases very early, volumes. The Trinity College Dublin library is one of the largest in Europe with 4.25 million books and electronic access to over 30,000 journals.

Dublin Trinity College Library.

Monday, 30 March 2015

Moscow Metro Stations, The Underground Palace

The Moscow Metro, the world first by passenger density, it carried 9.27 million people in 2011. Moscow metro stations also known as the underground palace. It has has 196 stations and a length of underground laying of 327.5 kilometers, with 12 lines. All lines are connecting with a 20 km long ring line. The line 2, 4  cross the Moskva river and line 1 cross Yauza river on a bridge. The majority of the network is hidden deep below the streets of Moscow – there are a total of 74 deep level stations, 87 on a more shallow level, a further ten on the surface, and four on elevation. The reasons for the construction of deep section station Arbatskaya lies in the onset of the Cold War . They are deep and are designed to hide people in the event of nuclear war.

Moscow Metro Stations, The Underground Palace

Saturday, 28 March 2015

Tulou, Ancient Earthen Complexes of China

Tulou is a kind of earthen houses, built by Hakka and Minnan peoples in the mountainous and rural areas of south-eastern China, mainly in the province of Fujian. They were mostly built between the 12th and the 20th centuries. Tulou is a powerful, multi-storey homes, usually circular in shape, with a very thick, 'almost 6 feet' of mud walls, reinforced with wood, bamboo and stones, with access to the central courtyard through one door only. The result is a well-lit, well-ventilated, windproof and earthquake-proof building that is warm in winter and cool in summer. Tulous usually have only one main gate, guarded by 4–5-inch-thick  or 100–130 mm wooden doors reinforced with an outer shell of iron plate. The top level of these earth buildings has gun holes for defensive purposes. In the middle of the stone courtyard is a small building performing ceremonial functions like weddings, funerals, prayer. The courtyard is surrounded by wooden corridors leading to housing consisting of two or three rooms. The two lowest floors of Tulou are bulky, do not have windows and are most commonly used as warehouses and granaries, while homes are located above the second floor.

Tulou, Ancient Earthen Complexes of China

The Waverley Cemetery, The self funded and iconic graveyard in Sydney

The Waverley Cemetery is located on top of the cliffs at Bronte in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. The first interment occurred on 4 August 1877 and noted for its largely intact Victorian and Edwardian monuments. The size of 41 acres bounded by Trafalgar, Boundary and St Thomas streets. The cemetery is self-funded, deriving its income from interments – including burial, cremation, memorials and mausolea – of which there has been over 86,000. It contains the graves of many significant Australians including the poet Henry Lawson, Jules Archibald, founder of The Bulletin and benefactor of the Archibald Prize, nineteenth century poet Henry Kendall, the American actor William E. Sheridan, poet and author Dorothea Mackellar and author Ethel Pedley.

The Waverley Cemetery, The self funded and iconic graveyard in Sydney