Monday, 15 May 2017

The Khatt Shebib — The Mysterious Wall in Jordan

The existence of the wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib. During a recent study, scientists found that the length of the wall, which stretches from north-east to south-west, is 106 km, according to Live Science. If we consider its branches and parallel sessions, its total length is about 150 km. Currently, the construction of only the ruins. According to scientists, initially the wall was not big. Its height was only about a meter, and its width is half a meter.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The wall could have served as a demarcation between the desert and the area in which farming was possible. Ancient towers in a mysterious landscape. The wall is dotted with hundreds of small towers, each measuring two to four meters in diameter. 

Kennedy suspects that some were built after the wall was constructed.  The towers likely had a variety of uses. "Some may have been places of refuge — a secure place to overnight. Others may have been used as watch posts. Some, perhaps, were places in which hunters could hide until browsing fauna was close enough to try and bring down," Kennedy told Live Science. Kennedy believes they did not serve a military purpose. The small towers along the wall remind him more of small shelters from sandstorms for hunters in the deep desert. Or they could have been used to store food. He admits that all these possibilities are just guesses. Since the wall was built of loose field-stones, it is impossible to tell who first constructed it. But it was a huge effort. Even if the wall was only one meter high or so, gathering the heavy stones and constructing them into a wall was no easy task, and could be indicative of central organization, archaeologists say.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

So far, the only dating information the scientists have comes from pottery found in the towers and other sites along the wall, Kennedy said. Based on the pottery found to date, the wall was likely built sometime between the Nabataean period (312 B.C.–A.D. 106) and the Umayyad period (A.D. 661–750), Kennedy said.

Specialists are also inclined to believe that the wall was not a defensive building. There is a version that the Hutt Shebib served as a border between the ancient farmers and nomadic peoples to cultivate the land. The purpose of the wall is also a mystery. 

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.

The Khatt Shebib wall was first reported in 1948 by Sir Alec Kirkbride, a British diplomat in Jordan. In 1948, who had seen the structure overhead while in an airplane and noticed a mysterious stone structure. It was a wall , known as the Khatt Shebib.


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