Monday, 12 January 2015

Covered Bridge in Lovech | A Romantic Hideway in Bulgaria

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town. After the bridge that then served the town was almost completely destroyed by a flood in 1872, the local police chief ordered the famous Bulgarian master builder Kolyu Ficheto to construct a new one. Ficheto personally chose the material for the wooden bridge. Each citizen of Lovech contributed to the building process, the poorer ones working themselves and the wealthier donating money and paying other workers. Building completed in 1874.

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
The initial bridge had a length of 84 m and 6 vents and accommodated 64 shops. It was, however, wholly destroyed by fire on the night of 2 to 3 August 1925. A more modern bridge was constructed at its place in 1931 only to be replaced by a reconstruction of Kolyu Ficheto's design in 1981-1982. The current bridge is 106 m long and has 14 shops, the architect being Zlatev. The covered bridge is a popular place among tourists, and souvenirs from Lovech can be bought from its shops. The bridge above the Osam river is also the only covered bridge on the Balkan Peninsula. In terms of natural landmarks Lovech has to offer much as well. [First Image credit Klearchos Kapoutsis]

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit gordontour

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit hedyelyakim

Lovech - Covered Bridge over Osam River
Lovech - Covered Bridge over Osam River. Image credit Lyura

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit hedyelyakim

The bridge of Lovech
The bridge of Lovech. Image credit Klearchos Kapoutsis
The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit Anton Angelov

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit nelly.valkova

The bridge built by Kolyu Ficheto, Lovech, Bulgaria
The bridge built by Kolyu Ficheto, Lovech, Bulgaria. Image credit  Plamena Tchervenkova
The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit Danail Nachev

The Covered Bridge in the town of Lovech, Bulgaria. The name comes from an old Bulgarian word meaning "River City". The bridge crosses the Osam River, connecting the old "Varosha" and new town parts of Lovech, being possibly the most recognisable symbol of the town.
Image credit Lyura

Source — WikipediaBulgariatravel

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